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The Mimosa Tree

As southerners, the beautiful Mimosa tree is quite often the first tree we came to know by name. As children we were captivated by the leaves that closed up at night as if by magic and the soft, fragrant, puffy pink flowers made us sneeze as we tickled our noses with them. Brought to the U.S. from Asia in 1745, this tropical looking tree took gardeners by storm and, as a result, the Mimosa is found all over the country where it is widely planted as an ornamental tree in parks and gardens. The deciduous tree forms a broad crown that provides highly desirable dappled shade in the hot summers and full sun in the winters. Mimosas burst into full bloom May through July bearing clouds of sweetly fragrant, hot pink, pom-pom like blossoms that are real attention grabbers!

Texas Wild Olives

We are happy to release a very nice crop of young Texas Wild Olives, aka Anacahuita or Mexican Olives! This ornamental member of the Borage family has highly attractive dark, soft, ovate leaves about 7" long by 3" wide. The small evergreen tree gets 15-30' by 10-16'. Atop this little jewel are clusters of the lovliest white, funnel-shaped flowers we have ever seen. Yellow throated and 2-3" across, they resemble delicate white crepe paper and bloom throughout the year!

The ESSENTIAL Southern Plant!

When the Magnolia tree's sweet fragrance fills the air, you KNOW you're in the south! So beloved is the majestic Magnolia tree in our history, it's been named the state flower of two states, Louisiana and Mississippi! Magnolias, a native North American, can also boast the largest flower of any native tree. Huge, handsome, delicately lemon-scented 6-8" white blooms perfume the garden in spring like nothing else can!