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Texas Wild Olive

This ornamental member of the Borage family has highly attractive dark, soft oval leaves about 7" long by 3" wide. The tree can reach 15-30' tall with a 10-16' spread. Although highly drought tolerant, it is very sensitive to cold weather north of the Austin area, but thrives in Zones 9-11. Clusters of pretty white, funnel-shaped flowers with yellow throats grow 2-3" across, and resemble delicate white crepe paper. The fruit may be sweet, but eaten raw they are slightly toxic and may cause dizziness. Early Texas settlers used the fruit to make a perfectly safe and delicious jelly, the syrup derived from the fruit as a cough medicine, a dye for cloth and a folk remedy for rheumatism. The wood is even highly prized in carpentry. Currently available here at the nursery in 15 gallon pots.

MAGNOLIAS

Magnolias are a southern landscape staple and here at Creekside Nursery, we currently have several different varieties and sizes on hand. Magnolia trees are diverse in leaf shape and plant form, and they come in both evergreen and deciduous varieties. Pick your planting site carefully. Almost all types are hard to move once established, and many grow quite large. Dense shade, shallow roots and year-round dropping of leaves make it virtually impossible to grow grass beneath the leaf spread, but they make a perfect backdrop for shrubs and hedges. Magnolias seldom have serious pest or disease problems and they are not a favorite of deer. The highly fragrant blooms are attractive to bees and the beautiful red to orange waxy seeds are a favorite staple to birds, squirrels and other wildlife.

Water Oak

Water Oak (Quercus nigra) is medium to large, a semi-evergreen tree. The leaves are dark green and bell-shaped, with alternate arrangement. The Water Oak has a medium fast growth rate, with height increases of more than 24" per year. At maturity, the Water Oak can grow to a height of 50-80’. Unlike the typical Live Oak, the Water Oak grows in a conical form and has a rounded crown at the top. The acorns of the Water Oak also differ from the Live Oak, they are a bit smaller and their caps are woolly, rather than scaly. The Water Oak grows in USDA zones 6-9.

Crape Myrtle

Crape Myrtles are a favorite for fun summer color. White, pink, magenta and purple - there is a color to fit any landscape. With their multi trunks and in older plants its peeling bark, they will make a great feature plant in your landscape. Plant in full sun for the best blooming. They can take very light shade but, will not have as many showy blooms. Water slowly and deeply at least once a week during the heat of the summer until they mature. Trim back in the late winter and early spring while dormant to shape, but it is not recommended to cut back too deeply Beware of planting near a pool area as they tend to decorate your pool with their blooms and leaves.

Black Oak

The Black Oak is very similar to the Red Oak, one of the main difference is that the Black Oak will thrive in poor soil conditions. This deciduous tree has deeply furrowed bark and on mature trees the bark is almost black. Black Oaks grow well on slopes and ridge line. The leaves of this oak have a soft velvet underside, and will produce a large crop acorns to help feed the wildlife in your area. This Oak can grow to 60-70 feet with an 40-50 foot spread. Will grow well in zones 3-8