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Texas Sages

Texas Sages are a dense, slow-growing shrub that tolerate heat, drought and poor soils. We carry several different varieties offering silvery-gray, greenish gray to lush green foliages. The beautiful flowers range in shades from pinks, to magentas to bluish purple and are attractive to bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. Thrives best planted in the ground in Zones 8-10 where it's hardy. Can also be planted in patio containers in colder zones for easy of movement and arranging. Left natural, Texas Sages can grow up to 8 feet tall. They handle pruning and shaping well and can even be groomed into a small tree form. Because of its drought tolerance, Texas Sages are often used in xeriscaping plans. They grow best in soils that are well-drained. It is sometimes called the "Barometer Bush" because flowering is triggered by humidity or high soil moisture after rains. These plants love the sun and produce their flowers most abundantly when they receive 6-8 hours of bright light.

Watermelon Carnival Heuchera

Also commonly known as Coral Bells or Alumroot, the Carnival line of Heuchera displays variegated foliages from pinks to black. Leaves of the Watermelon variety are a peachy-pink and shaped similar to grape or maple leaves. The foliage can last outside through the winter in warmer zones. Petite white bell-shaped flowers arise on long stems from the base of the plant in early to mid-summer and produce multiple rounds of blooms. This pretty perennial is easy to grow, deer resistant, is attractive to hummingbirds when in bloom and requires very little maintenance. Mature plant size can be 10-12" tall and 12-14" wide and can tolerate full sun in cooler zones to partial shade everywhere.

Texas Wild Olive

This ornamental member of the Borage family has highly attractive dark, soft oval leaves about 7" long by 3" wide. The tree can reach 15-30' tall with a 10-16' spread. Although highly drought tolerant, it is very sensitive to cold weather north of the Austin area, but thrives in Zones 9-11. Clusters of pretty white, funnel-shaped flowers with yellow throats grow 2-3" across, and resemble delicate white crepe paper. The fruit may be sweet, but eaten raw they are slightly toxic and may cause dizziness. Early Texas settlers used the fruit to make a perfectly safe and delicious jelly, the syrup derived from the fruit as a cough medicine, a dye for cloth and a folk remedy for rheumatism. The wood is even highly prized in carpentry. Currently available here at the nursery in 15 gallon pots.

Pride of Houston Yaupon Holly

This native Texas holly is most prized for the abundant red berries in fall through winter. The dark green foliage starts off a bright lighter green and darkens into glossy dark green. It attracts birds for the beautiful berries and bees for the small blooms. Thrives best in Zones 7-10 and can take full sun. Can grow to a height of 15-20’ and up to 15’ wide, but it responds well to heavy shearing and pruning so it’s a great candidate for topiary artists. Plant this Pride of Houston yaupon as a single specimen tree or as a beautiful and beneficial clump or hedge.

Purple Leaf Loropetalum

Sometimes called Chinese or Red Fringe Flower because of their frilly pinkish red flowers that bloom along the branches, the Purple Leaf Loropetalum is a beautiful shrub whose rich burgundy red foliage makes it an excellent focal plant or impressive hedge. The flowers are attractive to bees and the foliage is deer resistant. Recommended for Zones 7-10 and loves full sun but can also handle partial shade. They are easy to grow and tolerate a wide range of soils and landscape conditions. Loropetalums can grow 6-8' tall with a width of up to 6-8’, but can be pruned to maintain a smaller size and shape. Loropetalums here at Creekside Nursery are sold in a 3 gallon size.