what's new

Mexican Fan Palm

The Mexican Fan Palm has crowns of large, fan-shaped, bright green fronds and shorter leafstalks with drooping leaf tips. Elegant lined along a driveway, grouped in a landscape setting around a pool or accentuated by nighttime lighting as a specimen plant, the Mexican Fan Palm is a favorite of landscapers and home gardeners as well. This is a fast-growing, cold hardy palm, and they love to grow where there is full sun exposure. Easy to grow and maintain, they are drought and salt tolerant with low to moderate watering needs once established. They can grow up to five feet a year to a mature height of 60-100 feet with a frond spread up to 15 feet. Available here at the nursery in 3, 15 and 30 gallon sizes.

Allison Cuphea

Also known as Mexican or False Heather, this delicate-looking but tough and durable plant with small, deep green foliage and loads of tiny pinkish-purple flowers will bloom all summer long. Can be grown as an annual in cooler climates and is great for bedding, borders, and containers in warmer climates. Its pretty little flowers attract butterflies and bees. This plant is considered self-cleaning, so deadheading is not necessary. Allison Cuphea will grow to be about 24 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. This plant does best in full sun to partial shade. It prefers evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is also considered as drought tolerant. Hardy in Zones 9 and warmer, it may die back after hard frosts, but will re-grow from the roots.

BOXWOODS

Creekside Nursery offers two varieties of Boxwoods that can be used in an assortment of landscape applications. Japanese and Wintergreen Boxwoods make great natural or shaped hedges, topiaries and even bonsai art for the discerning grower. Both varieties produce white or creamy yellow flowers, but it’s the beautiful glossy green foliage that makes them a landscape standout. The Japanese applies itself well for screening hedges or doorway planters with its taller height while the Wintergreen’s more compact growth habit works well for planting under windows, in English garden designs or pathway definers. Relatively deer and disease resistant, our boxwoods are very easy to grow plants that require little care other than well-draining soil and work best with filtered sun. Both varieties are available in 1 and 3 gallons sizes.

White Rain Lily

Crocus-like flowers bloom from late spring through late summer, sometimes earlier during rainy seasons. Once established, after a late summer or autumn shower, expect the magic that this bulb is known for. Multiple flowers can bloom on each stem. This plant’s foliage has a narrow, grassy look similar to sedge. They naturalize easily, forming dense evergreen clumps 6-10” tall. Rain Lilies are a nice, low growing option beneath large trees, along paths or sidewalks, in rock gardens and for tucking into groundcovers for an extra bit of sparkle. And they will multiply on their own. Plant where afternoon shade is available to the plant, especially in the hottest areas. Rain Lily plants can be injured at 28 F. (-2 C) or lower temperatures. If you want to divide, or transplant them, wait until after the flowers have bloomed in the fall, just before the plants go dormant for the winter. When moving and transplanting Rain Lily bulbs, any time of year can work if the bulbs are planted quickly and watered in. Available in 1 gallon pots here at Creekside Nursery!

Turk’s Cap

An easily grown, old-time favorite, Creekside Nursery offers Turk’s Cap in shades of red and pink. This native Texas plant can handle sun, but does really well in partial to full shade. The unique flowers that never completely open are usually produced in showy profusion during hot weather from mid-to late summer through early fall. The protrusion of the stamen above the spiraling petals brings to mind the shape of a Turkish turban. Tolerant of both heat and humidity they are a great shrub-like plant for a background border since they can grow upwards of 5 feet with a similar width. Attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds for the nectar, they also attract birds and small wildlife for the apple-flavored red fruits produced after the bloom season.